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's not a pretty picture. here's just one example. three men on a summer's day in mississippi. why are they smiling and what are they really up to? yes, that's former president bill clinton on the right and on the left, his best friend forever, terry mcauliffe, former chairman of the democratic national committee, fundraiser supreme for both bill and hillary, and the personification of the corporate wing of the democratic party. smack in the middle, that's haley barbour, former chairman of the republican national committee. he made a fortune lobbying for corporations, especially for the ta backco industry, then went home to serve two terms as governor of mississippi, and couldn't wait to get back to washington, where once again, he's gun-slinging for the big boys. so why did these three d.c. desperadoes ride into a small mississippi town? seems that when barbour was governor, he offered mcauliffe a very attractive state package of price and tax subsidies for a plant there to build electric cars for his greentech automotive company. mcauliffe also tapped his politically connected network for more th
is recognizing our rights. that's something that's never happened in the whole history of mississippi my country. me and my partner says we are people that have dignity and respected that's a what this means (clapping) and i know that mayor newsom or governer likes the word extra ordinary but the country is sending a message because lgbt community that their rights were not ongoing by now they have to pay attention. we're now going to end with marriage equality there has to be equality for all of us including our transgender brothers and sisters. we're not leaving anyone behind this is only the beginning. thank you so much let's keep fighting. (clapping) >> his leadership has been extraordinary not only in his district it's going to be the site of a tremendous celebration this evening so have fun but really citywide and really statewide seeing as a tremendous leader supervisor scott wiener (clapping). >> thank you. thank you although the voters are annoy my - i want to thank my former boss city attorney dennis herrera. i remember back almost a decade ago from the very first moment he was there
old housing stock. we have the oldest housing stock this side of mississippi. and that's where our problems are most likely to be. >> i going to test the microphone and ask people how you expect your home to perform. >> anybody who wants to share. tell us, what kind of building. do you live in a wood frame >> yes >> after a major earthquake. what's your expectation. >> i am afraid from last year's earthquake class, you mentioned. the house might pop to the street because my garage is empty. >> is it in the middle of the block? >> middle. >> there's less chance. sir, what kind of building do you live in? >> i live in an apartment if ground floor parking. >> in the middle of the block, corner. >> corner. >> are there openings on both sides? >> yes. on both sides. >> it's a wood framed building? >> it seems to be a hybrid. with concrete and steel and wood frame on top of that. >> we don't often see that. modern buildings have a podium. >> what neighborhood are you in >> dolores park. >> you will hit the lake. if are in the dolores, you are in pretty good shape. >> what is your expecta
on the a dark rainy morning as he found himself biking to his miserable job in mississippi he felt real despair. from recognized he was 47 years old and never had a car and afford for 20 years in prison. sometimes he says it's little things like that that can drag him down into sorrow. he chose to do something that both keep those wasted years fresh in his memory. he helps to educate others in the hopes that his story will spur reform. he's not an educated man. his formal schooling stopped in 6th grade. the katrina criminal justice reform effort. that's the holistic reentry program for offenders. he told anybody with time to spare and inclination to listen. putting a face on an abstract idea, injustice. on this particular afternoon in may 2012, he tells this story to me for a fourth time. he is deeply preoccupied with a judge who denied his case for years. who also heard his murder case in 1976. the month he was released the judge died. greg goes to his house to get his tattered obituary he's read many times. the obituary says nice things. the judge may have been a goodman, greg muses, he might
'm a mississippi segragist and i'm proud of it. >> reporter: as the south resisted integration, president john f. kennedy grew frustrated, nelson says the president wanted to help blacks but also wanted to appease southern voters. >> the kennedys were sort of behind it but not really. i mean lip service was there. >> reporter: throughout that summer more than 300 freedom riders traveled through the deep south. in september the president's brother attorney general robert kennedy asked for and received more stringent regulations. by the end of 61, public transportation throughout the south was integrated. >> after the violent response to the freedom riders, president kennedy sent a bill to congress. he talked to the nation about why it should pass. >> now the time has come for this nation to fulfill its promise. the events in berming ham and elsewhere have so increased that cries for equality that no city or state or legislative body can choose to ignore them. the fires of frustration and discord are burning in every city. in demonstrations, parades and protests. which create tension and threaten
on the death list in mississippi and he took it upon himself to train our children what to do in case they heard gunfire. that's exactly what they did that night. each other helped each other to the bathroom to get in the tub and my screams stopped them from completing that hiding point. but we knew, you live with death threats constantly and you adapt your life to that. you might argue, but you don't leave without the embrace. you might become angry with things that are happening around you, but it's a time of support. it's a time of pulling people together. and during that time, we had the ages divided. there were the young people and there were the older people. those in the middle were more or less teachers who were a little afraid to speak up and stand out. medgarr stood alone in that battle. he did have supporters, of course, but he was the point person and it was extremely difficult for us as a family to live with that. but you lived as though every day was going to be your last together. it sounds a little sad but that's the way it was. >> one of your themes in your speech on
secretary of the naacp in mississippi, civil rights leader medgar evers organized voter registration efforts. evers was assassinated in 1963 mere months before the march on washington. since then as a civil rights activist and former executive director of the naacp, his widow myrlie evers williams has carried on his legacy. she joins me sitting rights here, along with joy reid, manager the grio and msnbc contributor. i have been chasing after you, joy. i see you everywhere but here. now i've got you here finally. you are very smart about this stuff. and i know you're from the younger generation. i want to get myrlie on this too. i want you to react to this. a couple of things. it's not just minority voters that benefit from traditional voting patterns. the easier way to vote, younger people have a harder time budgeting their time. they just do for whatever reason. the easier it is to vote, the more are going to vote. african-american voters, many don't have money to have a car, don't have a driver's license, may be older living in row houses like i used to live as a kid, and they basically h
, mississippi. and many may relate to that. the death of those three civil rights workers there. but you also relate the fact that there was many others all across the great state of mississippi and in other southern states who sacrificed as well. and so share some of your opinions on the ideal of galvanizing the college youth. >> we followed the tradition as college students of young people and college students all over the world. when you talk about changing the social order, it is usually the young people, the young, educated people who will generally spear that particular change. -- spearhead that particular change. so we followed that same historical tradition. when, we know about the three civil rights workers who were murdered, but during that same period from june, i think, through september a total of 7 other blacks -- 27 other blacks, young black males, were murdered in mississippi. i related the you the story of two students at alcorn college who were just coming back to the campus from downtown, and two carloads of klansmen kidnapped them, and they found be their bodies, i think,
. make no mistake, president obama believes there mississippi be accountability for those who would use the world's most heinous weapons against the world's most vulnerable people. nothing today is more serious and nothing is receiving more serious scrutiny. thank you. >> i'm trace gallagher in for shepard smith. just heard secretary of said john kerry giving his first accounts of the crisis in syria. the secretary delivers litany of what they believe is the proof that chemical weapons were used in syria. as important as what he laid out is what when he did not lay out, is a time line of dealing with syria, going after the regimes. what the did lay out there have to be consequences for any action, any chemical weapon used and said the president at some point in time will decide what to do but made it very, very clear the secretary of state believes there will be some type of action used against sirra, but keep in mind, we have u.n. inspectors on the ground, and seemed to indicate that did not matter. the inspectors would fine there was the use of chemical weapons but could not determine
. you saw selma in the 1965 voting rights act. you saw the mississippi summer project in the 1964 civil rights bill. you saw affirmative action, you saw all of these things grow out of that. you saw an effort to empower marginalize eed people across te country. we used the model we were using in terms of organizing and sex-determination pulling people together so they could take control of their own lives. those models were actually both things that grew out of the movement. washington is one of those epic points that there are a number of other epic points that actually pulled this whole process together. i think it's important to understand that even on the struggles on the march on washington, get the message out. >>ifill: we are still having big national conversations as they say about race, still coming out of the trayvon martin episode. and i wonder as you look back we wonder whether it's leadership that's missing, whether we're just not honest as a people in discussing these issues or whether we've come much further than they give us credit for? >> i think we have come a long way
like a coin flip. stories about green tech automatic, fledgling car company he moved to mississippi and hasn't gotten off to a booming start. all that said, a quinnipiac poll last week had mcauliffe up among likely voters. no one on either side believes mcauliffe is up by quite that much but everyone believes he is ahead and it's clear cuccinelli's campaign is worried. in fact, so worried, they're going after mcdonnell. cuccinelli has run a good campaign but it's the issue that he can't control the gop has concluded is a serious liability. governor mcdonnell. it was just months ago they fought over who would be more like mcdonnell as a governor. in what can only be described as a stunning development, cuccinelli went negative on mcdonnell in a tv ad called facts. >> the truth, there's only one candidate under investigation, terry mcauliffe. the press calls the attacks false. a democratic commonwealth attorney cleared kucuccinelli o any wrongdoing. cuccinelli launched the investigation into bob mcdonnell and called for reform. those are the facts. >> let's bring in the gaggle. nbc po
that stretched across texas, mississippi, alabama and georgia. david matting i will ask outfront on this story. hi, david. what did investigators find? >> reporter: first of all they found 367 dogs. over 100 of them just in one single location. they've arrested ten men, seven of them came from the state of alabama. but this goes beyond just fighting dogs and the atrocities involved in that. they're looking at what they also seized here in terms of money. they seized a half million dollars in this raid on friday that shows you what big money is being had at these dog-fighting operations. they believe some of these defendants may have been guam blank as much as five to $200,000 on a single dog fight. again, showing you what kind of money was involved in these operations. so going much further than just dog fighting. they're also looking at illegal gambling operations and what sort of organizations might be out there associated with this. >> that's big money. what will happen to these dogs? >> right now, they're in emergency shelters. they're being cared for and getting medical treatment and food
: mississippi, alabama and north carolina are trying to move sea head. but colin powell is among those who claims these will make voting more difficult. >> these procedures to slow the process down and making it likely fewer hispanics and african-americans will backfire. these people will come out to do what they have to do to vote and i encourage that. >> reporter: the justice department is trying to stop the spread by taking texas to court. bill: about five minutes before the hour now. crossing the red line. all eyes on the pentagon. syria said to be launching chemical weapons. the big question now. will the white house lead or follow. martha: the new fallout for the so-called thrill kill after young australian ball player. what the governor of oklahoma is saying about the silence from the president. >> he was such an amazing person. i'm going to miss him forever. but i'm really glad i got the four years with him. golden opportunity sales event and experience the connectivity of the available lexus enform, including the es and rx. ♪ this is the pursuit of perfection. ♪ help the gulf
with teeders ---door key leader us of our allies. make no mistake, president obama believes there mississippi be accountability for those who would use the world's most heinous weapons against the world's most vulnerable people. nothing today is more serious and nothing is receiving more serious scrutiny. thank you. >> i'm trace gallagher in for shepard smith. just heard secretary of said john kerry giving his first accounts of the crisis in syria. the secretary delivers litany of what they believe is the proof
.d. law, so ra mississippi, alabama so there is a signal to take on texas. arthel: thank you very much for that update. jon: turn to egypt where two top islamic groups are reportedly seeking a truce with egypt's military a. cording to the associateded press, the groups are willing to stop massive military tests in exchange to crackdown on muslim brotherhood supporters. joining us to talk about this and the larger issues, chris can and political activist who fled egypt in 2011. good to have you on. >> thank you for having me. jon: this request for a truce from the islamist groups, what do you make of that? >> if that's conditioned by the reinstallment of muhammad morsi, i do not think that this is ever going to happen and i do not think that it would be fair to refer to what these muslim brotherhood gatherings as protests. if we can say that the boston bomber was a protestor, there's much protestors as he was. jon: the coptic christians have bourne the brunt of the rage that's issued by many of the muslim brotherhood supporters. so many of the churches have been burned. what's behind th
.the burden on the we went out one time to mississippi. we were there, and then we went andto earning him alabama we heard the same story time and again. a woman being abused. a neighbor or woman calls up, and guess who goes to jail. the person who called them because they say that woman does not have papers. what does law enforcement due? that is why you have to separate law enforcement from immigration policy. the police are there to protect the people. they have to protect the women and the families. it is fine and dandy to talk about safety, but we have to understand just how safety really has a corrosive effect. the police, their cars are important to them to protect them. their guns are important to them . their communication, their training is important, but the most important tool, instrument that the police have is the people and the cooperation of the people. pass immigration law to criminalize all emigrants and make them fear the police, you make all of us less safe and you make us all a nation in which we perpetrate injustice on people here who have been submitted to crimes an
from katrina: how my mississippi hometown lost it all what mattered." i want to ask a brief question. how do you get cities to be willing to invest in resilience in the tough times in something that might happen. preparing for the possible when they are dealing with so many presses issues right now, again, the economy, crime,th. >> thank you. i would like jane first to lead off about a project might be working on. >> david mentioned that i'm working on a project, i have been because we have been so blessed in joplin and certainly not become experts by any mean. i think we have a set of practical experience. i've collected so far about 40 essays from people across all sector of joplin who are vod -- involved in recovery from the hospital chief to the city manager to the superintendent of schools about what we learn in the first year we think are lessons can pass on what we wish wed had known. the more i publicly state my goal the more it has to happen. i'm hoping i'll be done with it by the end of september and able to give it out to anyone in a way that is interested in a community o
, mississippi, who has everybody fired up at just 5 years old, samuel green realized he had a special gift. >> three years later he's a veteran of the pulpit inspiring everyone who wants to listen wherever he goes. take a look. >> he had nothing. he lost his land. he lost his animals. he lost his sons and daughters. but do you know what job did? job fell to his knees and began worshiping god saying the lord has gave and the lord has taken away. blessed be the name of the lord. >> preaching it there, samuel. samuel is here with his mother and his mentor. welcome to everybody. >> hello. >> hi. >> you are just a bright light, aren't you sitting over there. >> yes. >> and even without those teeth. it's unbelievable. >> when you are up there preaching, are you just memoryizing things? tell us what you are doing when you are up there. >> it's something i do every day stuff and i really don't forget it. i really don't get nervous because i know god has my back. >> god has your back. >> so are all your sermons about bible stories? >> well, yes. >> do you have a favorite one, like david and goliath
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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